Carpal tunnel syndrome can be linked to rare form of heart disease

Protein can deposit into different organs, doctor says

Carpal tunnel syndrome can be linked to rare form of heart disease

The nerve disorder, carpel tunnel syndrome, affects millions of Americans. What most people do not know is that it can be linked to a rare form of heart disease.Michael Lane, 69, of Stilwell, Kansas, gets emotional talking about the past 18 months, which included symptoms of swelling, fatigue and dizziness.”Last year, I came to this exact office. I could not make it from the parking lot to the office,” Lane said.Lane met cardiologist Dr. Brett Sperry, who has done research on amyloidosis.”A protein in your body changes shape, misfolds and starts depositing into different organs,” Sperry said.For Lane, the protein had built up in his heart. Left untreated, it can be deadly. Lane might have been diagnosed years ago, when he was treated for carpal tunnel in both wrists. He had a 1 in 10 chance of developing this condition.Fortunately, Lane was approved for an experimental drug called Tafamidis, and it’s working.”Through Dr. Sperry’s treatment, I’m, like, 80 percent better than I was last year at this time,” Lane said.Sperry recommends carpal tunnel patients request a biopsy from their surgeon to look for the amyloidosis protein deposits.”Getting patients early before they have heart disease is really the most important thing we can do,” Sperry said.

The nerve disorder, carpel tunnel syndrome, affects millions of Americans. What most people do not know is that it can be linked to a rare form of heart disease.

Michael Lane, 69, of Stilwell, Kansas, gets emotional talking about the past 18 months, which included symptoms of swelling, fatigue and dizziness.

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“Last year, I came to this exact office. I could not make it from the parking lot to the office,” Lane said.

Lane met cardiologist Dr. Brett Sperry, who has done research on amyloidosis.

“A protein in your body changes shape, misfolds and starts depositing into different organs,” Sperry said.

For Lane, the protein had built up in his heart. Left untreated, it can be deadly. Lane might have been diagnosed years ago, when he was treated for carpal tunnel in both wrists. He had a 1 in 10 chance of developing this condition.

Fortunately, Lane was approved for an experimental drug called Tafamidis, and it’s working.

“Through Dr. Sperry’s treatment, I’m, like, 80 percent better than I was last year at this time,” Lane said.

Sperry recommends carpal tunnel patients request a biopsy from their surgeon to look for the amyloidosis protein deposits.

“Getting patients early before they have heart disease is really the most important thing we can do,” Sperry said.


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This is is a syndicated post. Read the original at www.kmbc.com

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